Some of the area’s fascinating art pieces are public art, in view for all to enjoy.

Mississauga has established an art collection that has grown to nearly 20 permanent public art pieces and also includes ongoing presentations of temporary art. The goal of the collection is to create beautiful, thought-provoking and energetic displays that ultimately enhance the quality of life for residents and visitors.

The artwork can be in any media and take on any shape, form or scale. The pieces may be stand-alone, site-specific or integrated into other design elements such as street furniture, architecture or landscape.

The artwork of Building Colour, by artist Panya Clark Espinal, is located in seven Mississauga Transitway stations: Central Parkway, Tomken, Dixie, Tahoe, Etobicoke Creek, Spectrum, and Orbitor.

Building Colour uses sculptural components made of bronze, architectural glass, and colour- changing lighting. The artwork at Tahoe and Etobicoke Creek stations even have touch-sensitive triggers for the audience to change their colour and light patterns. The artwork stages the tools and equipment used for glass installation and simulates an unoccupied work site.

Pine Sanctuary is a large-scale aluminum structure located at the entrance of The Riverwood Conservancy on Burnhamthorpe Rd. W. Created by Artist Marc Fornes/THEVERYMANY, Pine Sanctuary offers a dynamic experience of space and light from within. It was built through a process of computational design and digital fabrication and was funded in part under the Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program in recognition of Canada’s 150th anniversary.

Familia, by artist Stephen Cruise, is be found in Port Credit’s Harold E. Kennedy Park as an extension of the children’s play area. These polished granite sculptures on limestone bases include a turtle shell, tree, fish, fox, rail, boat, tank, lion, and beehive and are positioned to imitate the flow pattern of the Credit River. Of particular significance is the beehive, which not only represents a central place of collective activity but also references the Saint Lawrence Starch Company that had a mill on the site and used a beehive as its logo.

The Book, by artist Ilan Sandler, is fittingly located across from the Central Library in Celebration Square. The Book is a large-scale painted steel sculpture with two pages torn away from its spine. The Book’s pages appear to blow in the wind, while one of the pages dances away. Up close the inside is covered in symbols, all of which have evolved from early alphabets.

Contemplating Child, by artist Ferruccio Sardella, is located at Community Common Park on Princess Royal Dr. near City Hall. This 3,500-pound steel sculpture depicts a child posed in a reflective state and honours children and families within the community.

For the full gallery of Mississauga’s public art collection pieces and their locations, visit culture.mississauga.ca/collection/gallery-permanent-art-pieces.

Image: Familia by Stephen Cruise at Harold E. Kennedy Park in Port Credit (Source: City of Mississauga)